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The National Institute for Climatic Change Research (NICCR) is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER). The goal of NICCR is to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in the support of the climatic change research objectives of BE

The National Institute for Climatic Change Research (NICCR) is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Office of Biological and Environmental Research (BER), which is part of the DOE's Office of Science. The goal of NICCR is to mobilize university researchers, from all regions of the country, in support of the climatic change research objectives of DOE/BER.

The NICCR is managed and coordinated through five Regional Centers, hosted by Pennsylvania State University, Duke University, Michigan Technological University, Northern Arizona University, and Tulane University.


Summary:

This request for proposals is to (1) perform one-year synthesis activities that address a clearly defined gap in scientific knowledge of terrestrial ecosystems and climate change, (2) renew ongoing NICCR research projects for one year, or (3) carry out value-added additions to existing NICCR or non-NICCR-funded experiments that can be completed in one year.  The question(s) proposed by investigators should be answerable within the one-year project period.

NICCR divides terrestrial ecosystems into two groups: inland (not adjacent to an ocean) and coastal (adjacent to an ocean, including barrier islands).

For inland terrestrial ecosystems, the main climatic changes of interest are changes in temperature and precipitation.  Research should:  (1) answer important questions about potential effects of climatic change on the structure and functioning of terrestrial ecosystems within the 50 states or District of Columbia; (2) evaluate or improve the understanding and prediction of potential effects of climatic change on the future geographic distribution of U.S. terrestrial ecosystems at the regional scale; (3) use measurements of contemporary exchanges of mass and energy between the atmosphere and terrestrial ecosystems to answer important questions about possible effects of an altered terrestrial carbon cycle and/or surface energy exchange on global and/or regional climate; or (4) use synthesis of existing experimental or observational data, or modeling, to answer important questions about potential effects of climatic change on U.S. ecological systems and/or feedbacks from U.S. terrestrial ecosystems to climate at the regional scale.  Proposals for research on inland ecosystems should be submitted to one of the four NICCR Regional Centers.

For coastal ecosystems, the climatic changes of interest are sea-level rise and the possibility of increased frequency and/or intensity of storms (including hurricanes) directly affecting U.S. coastal ecosystems.  Ecosystems to be studied will be the terrestrial ecosystems (including wetland and freshwater ecosystems, but not marine or estuarine ecosystems) in the coastal states that could be directly and significantly altered by sea-level rise or increased frequency or intensity of coastal storms.  The ecological endpoints of interest are ecosystem or species migrations, changes in biodiversity, changes in primary production, or alterations in goods and services uniquely supplied by coastal terrestrial ecosystems.  Proposals for research on coastal ecosystems should be submitted to the NICCR Coastal Center.



Regional Centers


Click a region on the map below to go to that region's Center or go to the
DOE National Institute for Climatic Change Research.

 

 

Western Regional Center Midwestern Regional Center Southeastern Regional Center Northeastern Regional Center